Communication

 

Joseph A. Bonito

Associate Professor, Department of Communication

jbonito@email.arizona.edu

http://comm.arizona.edu/jbonito

Joseph A. Bonito is Associate Professor in the University of Arizona Department of Communication. His research focuses on small group communication processes, especially the characteristics of participation, as well as its antecedents and relation to group outcomes. Dr. Bonito was a Co-PI on several large grants, one awarded through the Army Research Institute that investigated the relation between computer-mediated communication and decision-making processes, and another through the National Cancer Institute that examined the decision-making strategies of the North American Quitline Consortium.

Related publications:

Bonito, Joseph A. and Renee A. Meyers. 2011. "Examining functional communication as egocentric or group-centric: Application of a latent group model."  Communication Monographs 78(4): 463-485. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03637751.2011.618138

Bonito, Joseph. A. and Erin K. Ruppel. 2011. "An application of the socio-egocentric model to information-sharing discussions: In search of group-level communication influences." Communication Research 38(3): 356 -375. http://crx.sagepub.com/content/38/3/356.short

Bonito, Joseph A. and Robert E. Sanders. 2011. "The existential center of small groups: Members’ conduct and interaction." Small Group Research 42(3): 343 -358.http://sgr.sagepub.com/content/42/3/343

Bonito, Joseph A., Mary H. DeCamp and Erin K. Ruppel. 2008.  "The Process of Information Sharing in Small Groups: Application of a Local Model."  Communication Monographs 75: 136-157. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03637750802082078

Bonito, Joseph A. 2006. “A Longitudinal Social Relations Analysis of Participation in Small Groups.” Human Communication Research 32(3): 302-321. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-2958.2006.00277.x/full

Bonito, Joseph A. 2003. “A Social Relations Analysis of Participation in Small Groups.” Communication Monographs 70(2): 83-97. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0363775032000133755

Bonito, Joseph A. 2001. “An Information-Processing Approach to Participation in Small Groups.” Communication Research 28(3): 272-303.

 

 

Kevin Coe

Assistant Professor, Department of Communication

kevincoe@email.arizona.edu

http://comm.arizona.edu/kevincoe

http://nicd.arizona.edu/grant-awards

Kevin Coe is Assistant Professor in the University of Arizona Department of Communication. His research focuses on the interaction of American political discourse, news media, and public opinion. He is the coauthor, with David Domke, of The God Strategy: How Religion Became a Political Weapon in America (2010), published by Oxford University Press. He is currently a Co-PI on an NICD SEED grant investigating patterns and determinants of civility in online discussions.

Related publications:

Coe, Kevin. 2011. “George W. Bush, Television News, and Rationales for the Iraq War.” Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 55(3): 307-324. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08838151.2011.597467

Althaus, Scott L. and Kevin Coe. 2011. “Priming Patriots: Social Identity Processes and the Dynamics of Public Support for War.” Public Opinion Quarterly 75(1): 65-88. http://poq.oxfordjournals.org/content/75/1/65

Domke, David and Kevin Coe. 2010. The God Strategy: How Religion Became a Political Weapon in America. New York: Oxford University Press.

Coe, Kevin, David Tewksbury, Bradley J. Bond, Kristin L. Drogos, Robert W. Porter, Ashley Yahn and Yuanyun Zhang. 2008. “Hostile News: Partisan Use and Perceptions of Cable News Programming.” Journal of Communication 58(2): 201-219. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1460-2466.2008.00381.x/abstract

 

 

Ed Donnerstein

Professor, Department of Communication

edonners@email.arizona.edu

http://comm.arizona.edu/ed-donnerstein

Ed Donnerstein is Professor in the University of Arizona Department of Communication. His research focuses on mass-media violence, as well as mass media policy. In 2008 he received the American Psychological Association Media Psychology Division Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Media Psychology. He was primary research site director for the National Cable Television Associations project on television violence. He served as Dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Arizona from 2002-2009.

Related publications:

Donnerstein, Ed. 2013. “The Role of the Internet.” Pp. 401-434 in Children, Adolescents and the Media (3rd Edition), edited by Victor Strasburger, Barbara J. Wilson, and Amy B. Jordan. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, in press.

Donnerstein, Ed. 2011. “The Media and Aggression: From TV to the Internet.” Pp. 267-284 in The Psychology of Social Conflict and Aggression, edited by Joseph P. Forgas, Arie W. Kruglanski and Kipling D. Williams. New York: Psychology Press.

Donnerstein, E. 2013. Children and the Internet. Pp. 273-282 in The Oxford Handbook of Media Psychology, edited by K. Dill. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

 

Jay Hmielowski

Assistant Professor, Department of Communication

jayhmielowski@email.arizona.edu

http://comm.arizona.edu/jay-hmielowski

Jay Hmielowski is Assistant Professor in the University of Arizona Department of Communication. His research interests include environmental communication, science communication, and political communication. Specifically, he is interested in how different types of messages or the combination of conflicting messages affect the structure of people’s attitudes, and how such attitudes influence outcome variables such as information seeking, information processing, and engaging in environmental or political behaviors. He is also interested in institutional trust and its affect on attitudes and behaviors.

Related publications:

Hmielowski, Jay D. 2012. "Intramedia Moderation, Electoral Ambivalence, and Electoral Decision Making.” Mass Communication and Society 15(3): 454-477. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15205436.2011.616640

Hmielowski, Jay D., R. Lance Holbert & Jayeon Lee. 2011. “Predicting the Consumption of Political TV Satire: Affinity for Political Humor, The Daily Show and The Colbert Report.” Communication Monographs 78(1): 96-114. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03637751.2010.542579

 

 

Kate Kenski

Associate Professor, Department of Communication

kkenski@email.arizona.edu

http://comm.arizona.edu/kkenski

http://nicd.arizona.edu/grant-awards

Kate Kenski is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication and School of Government & Public Policy at the University of Arizona where she teaches political communication, public opinion, and research methods. She has published over thirty articles, books, and book chapters on political communication. Her recent book The Obama Victory: How Media, Money, and Message Shaped the 2008 Election (co-authored with Bruce W. Hardy and Kathleen Hall Jamieson; June 2010, Oxford University Press) has won several awards including the PROSE Award for 2010 Best Book in Government & Politics, the 2011 International Communication Association Outstanding Book Award, the 2012 National Communication Association Diamond Anniversary Book Award, and the 2012 National Communication Association Political Communication Division Roderick P. Hart Outstanding Book Award. She is Co-PI on a current NICD SEED grant investigating “Patterns and determinants of civility in online discussions.” She is also PI on the University of Arizona subcontract of an IARPA (Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity) grant on mitigating analytical bias through CYCLES of transformative learning in serious games.

Related Publications:

Kenski, Kate, Bruce Hardy and Kathleen Hall Jamieson. 2010. The Obama victory: How media, money, and message shaped the 2008 election. New York: Oxford University Press.

Kenski, Henry C., and Kate Kenski. 2009. "Explaining the vote in the election of 2008: The Democratic revival." Pp. 244-290 in The 2008 presidential campaign: A communication perspective, edited by Robert E. Denton, Jr. Boulder, CO: Rowman & Littlefield.

Romer, Daneil, Kate Kenski, Kenneth Winneg, Christopher Adasiewicz, and Kathleen Hall Jamieson. 2006. Capturing campaign dynamics: The National Annenberg Election Survey 2000 and 2004. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Pasek, Josh, Kate Kenski, Daniel Romer, and Kathleen Hall Jamieson. 2006. "America's youth and community engagement: How use of mass media is related to civic activity and political awareness in 14- to 22-year-olds." Communication Research 33: 115-135. http://crx.sagepub.com/content/33/3/115

 

 

Stephen Rains

Associate Professor, Department of Communication

srains@email.arizona.edu

http://comm.arizona.edu/stephen-rains

http://nicd.arizona.edu/grant-awards

Stephen Rains is Associate Professor in the University of Arizona Department of Communication. His research focuses on new communication technologies, social influence, and health communication. He is particularly interested in issues that intersect these domains. He is currently Co-PI on an NICD SEED grant investigating patterns and determinants of civility in online discussions.

Related publications:

Ruppel, Erin K. and Stephen Rains. 2012. “Information Sources and the Health Information-Seeking Process: An Application and Extension of Channel Complementarity Theory.” Communication Monographs 79(3): 358-405. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03637751.2012.697627

Rains, Stephen and David M. Keating. 2011. “The Social Dimension of Blogging about Health: Health Blogging, Social Support, and Well-Being.” Communication Monographs 78(4): 511-534. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03637751.2011.618142

Banas, John A. and Stephen Rains. 2010. “A Meta-Analysis of Research on Inoculation Theory." Communication Monographs 77(3): 281-311. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03637751003758193