Religious Studies

 

Hester Oberman

Senior Lecturer, Religious Studies Program

hoberman@email.arizona.edu

http://religious.arizona.edu/fac_oberman.html

Hester Oberman is Senior Lecturer in the University of Arizona Religious Studies Program. Her academic interest is the psychology of religion focusing on the fault line between inner religious experiences, cognition of self and moral reasoning and external, observable scientific facts, group dynamics, and social, political influences. More specifically, her interests lie in the difference and overlap between spirituality, psychology and the mind, the problem of religious violence, its psychological implications, and the evolving role of religion in the 21st Century.

 

 

 

Karen K. Seat

Director & Associate Professor, Religious Studies Program

kkseat@email.arizona.edu

http://religious.arizona.edu/fac_seat.html

Karen Seat is Associate Professor and Director of the University of Arizona Religious Studies Program. Her research focuses on conservative Christians' engagement with American politics in modern American history. She received the Provost’s Grand Challenges Grant through the University of Arizona Confluence Center for Creative Inquiry, to support her research on conservative Christians’ political activism. For her current book project, she has traveled the United States interviewing leaders of the complex movement that is often dubbed “the Christian Right.” Her previous book, “Providence Has Freed Our Hands”: Women’s Missions and the American Encounter with Japan, examines nineteenth-century Protestant women's mission movements and their impact on American ideologies regarding gender, race, Christianity, and civilization.

Related publications:

Seat, Karen K. 2008. “Providence has Freed our Hands”: Women’s Missions and the American Encounter with Japan. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press.